Paraphrased Politics

By Izhaan Ahmed


To many people, politics today can seem overwhelming with complicated terms flying around cable TV and confusing vocabulary spreading around social media.


On January 6, Congress was scheduled to certify the election results. In a typical year, this event would go unnoticed, since it is purely ceremonial. However, during a time when 39% of Americans believed that the election was rigged in a result-altering way, this event was perceived to be the last time that people could change the outcome.


...it is more important than ever that we act as one nation, and let our nation be unified once more...

Following the rally, thousands of Trump supporters flooded the streets of Washington, D.C., and eventually, the Capitol building was stormed and protestors bypassed security measures. Around five thousand of those people made it into the Capitol building by force. The Congressional session was postponed until the safety of the members of Congress was guaranteed. Eventually, law enforcement intervened and Congress concluded the vote counting several hours after the attack.


The majority of Americans, as well as many members of Congress, believe that the event at the Capitol was despicable and an unpatriotic move. Some have labeled it as a “failed coup,” since those who went into the building were presumed to have a strong desire to take over the government. However, many people disagreed about whether or not Trump should have been removed from office and banned from running for office again.


Source by Anna Detke

The United States is more politically divided than ever before thanks to the wide range of topics and opinions that have popped up this year.


The former president’s language was yet another issue. The manner by which he conveys certain statements causes different groups of people to come to different conclusions from the same speech. The ultimate debate is Trump’s rhetoric and if it has been substantially dangerous enough to warrant action.


“The current state of division in the nation is not very swag,” said sophomore Ethan Siegel.


Another debate has risen over whether or not the impeachment of a former president—which would only legally serve the purpose of barring him from running for president again—is constitutional or not, since the exact phrasing on the Constitution is unclear. However, on February 9, 2021, the Senate narrowly voted 56-44 that it was constitutional.


The two parts of the legislative branch must approve convicting the president before it can happen. However, whereas the House of Representatives requires a simple majority—218 out of 435 members—to approve the impeachment, two-thirds of the Senate—67 out of 100 members—are required to be in favor of impeachment in order for it to be enacted.


The concept of pardoning has also been discussed in the past few weeks. Pardoning is an action that can be done by the president, and it allows for someone to be completely excused from crimes on the federal level. Some of Trump’s pardons have provoked controversy, as well as rumors that he pardoned himself.


"Recently, our nation, political parties, and even our community has become more divided than ever. It is essential that we understand each other's opposing viewpoints and respect each other as fellow Americans. Although both the Democrats and the Republicans have acted selfishly over the past few months, it is more important than ever that we act as one nation, and let our nation be unified once more. Additionally, it is crucial that we allow for an environment where others don't feel targeted and where we can all share our opinions equally,” said senior Joshua Eisenberg.


The House of Representatives swiftly voted for the impeachment, but the impeachment bill has to pass the Senate.


With the events at the Capitol building resulting in the impeachment of former President Donald Trump, many Americans all across the country found it daunting to take a step back and look at both sides from an outsider’s perspective, or to keep up with the events at all.